Interior Decorating

Hacks for Hanging Frames, Photos and Artwork

For a lot of people, hanging a picture frame on the wall seems like an easy thing to do. But for people who actually do some decorating, it always ends up being harder than you think. The process of hanging artwork is not so fun, and sometimes you end up drilling more holes on the wall than what you actually need. Many people perfect their hanging game through trial and error over the years, but we are here to teach you some hacks so you can perfect it the first time.

Hacks for Hanging Frames, Photos and Artwork

Photocopy the item you want to hang

Putting the nail in the right place is one of the hardest things to do when hanging a framed photo or artwork. Sometimes, no matter how carefully you measured, you can’t get the mounting screws on the right place. If getting accurate is a struggle, this is a hack that will surely help you. Simply photocopy the item you want to hang, then tape it on the wall where you want it placed. Drill where needed and voila, you’ve got the holes in the right places.

Use a clothespin and nail to precisely hang a frame

You can use your clothespin to guide you where you should drive the nail. Just insert a small nail into the bottom of the clothespin in a manner where a small portion of the tip is poking out. Hold the clothespin from the top while you’re placing the frame hook on the head side of the nail (you may need assistance here). Once you set the place where the frame must be, lightly tap it so that the pointy side of the nail will make an indentation on the wall. That mark will indicate where you should drive the nail.

Use a picture wire if you don’t want to deal with double hooks

A lot of large frames come with double hooks, which consists of one on each side. This distributes the weight of the frame because they’re usually too heavy. Drilling two holes on the wall can be frustrating, as you keep on ensuring the levelness. To make things easier for you, simply use a picture wire and string it through both hooks. Follow instructions on the wire package on how to properly tie and secure it on the frame. And when attaching the wire, make sure that it’s tight, and it shouldn’t hang higher than the picture as it will look tacky. Once the wire is attached, place a nail on the wall where the middle portion of the wire will lie. Adjust it left or right to ensure levelness, then gravity will do the rest.

Use painter’s tape to mark where you want to drill two holes

Hanging an artwork using a single nail is a bit difficult as it is, but when you’re talking about two-hole or two-hook frames, it becomes more frustrating. One neat trick to do for this – without needing to use a measuring tape and a pencil to mark – is using painters tape (or any tape really). Just use a piece of tape on the back of your frame between the two holes. Then, transfer the tape to the wall to line up and level the holes. You can now drill holes and drive your nails to the wall at each end of the tape. The frame you’ll hang should slide perfectly to the holes, once it’s done properly.

Pinpoint the area using pushpins

Here’s another easy solution to mark nail hole position on the wall. Glue two pushpins placed top to top with a super glue. Determine the center of the frame on its upper back edge and press in one of the pins. Then hold the picture up and maneuver it to the right spot. Press in the frame so that the other pointy side of the pin marks an indentation on the wall. This hack works best if you’re hanging the frame with hardware screwed on the back of the frame.

Use toothpaste to mark the spot

Yes, you can get the help of some toothpaste to aid you in your picture hanging activity. Place a small dab of toothpaste on the back of the frame hook or string (or whatever touches the nails), then hold up the frame to the wall and position it carefully. Remove the frame, and the spot of the toothpaste on the template will mark where you must hammer the nail. Wipe away the toothpaste after.

Create a template using cardboard or paper when hanging more than one thing

When hanging more than one frame, plan out where they will all go beforehand by cutting out the size and shape of the frame or art in cardboard or paper. Then, arrange the cardboard on the wall until you get an alignment that looks good for you, then tape it with a low-adhesive masking tape. Nail them on the wall accordingly.

When displaying photos on a bulletin board, use paper clips

If you got a bulletin board in your home office or bedroom and you love displaying photos there, you can avoid damaging the photos with a hole from the pushpin. To save them from getting holes, use paper clips. Slide a paperclip for every photo and tack the paperclips (not the photos) to the corkboard. This way they stay in place without damaging your beloved pictures, plus your paperclips of choice can add color to your bulletin board!

Here are other useful tips to keep in mind as you hammer and place your artwork on the wall:

  • Invest in a good picture frame level

If you want a fuss-free, perfectly level hanging of frames, a level is a must-have. It’s good if you already have it in your toolbox, but if you don’t have one yet, you should get one.

  • Protect paint on your walls with a clear tape before hammering

Before you hammer a nail to the wall, you can cover the spot first using a clear tape. This can be done to protect the paint from chipping

  • Use a comb when hammering if you want to protect your fingers

Sometimes, it’s scary to use a hammer to push a nail down because you may end up hitting your fingers. But you can protect them by using a thick plastic comb – yes the kind of comb you use with your hair. Just place the comb on your target spot and slip a nail through two of its tooth and hold it steady. It would help if the spaces on the comb is tighter than the thickness of the nail so it can stay put.

  • You can also use dental floss

If you want to hang a lightweight artwork using wire, you don’t need to buy a picture wire. A dental floss can work just fine.

 

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